Steve and Devon’s Wedding in Ireland

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My wife and I decided right away after I proposed that we wanted to have a destination wedding. After some discussion we decided on Ireland. I can tell you there are not may places with such beautiful landscapes, colorful people, history and romantic settings as Ireland. Once we made the decision to work with Rosemarie, the first thing that she really made me feel good about was our budget. We had a number in our head of what we wanted to spend and were determined to stick to it. Rosemarie was very understanding of that fact and made us feel like we were a real priority to her. Even though our budget was modest. The end result of all Rosemarie’s hard work and time was a wedding in an Irish Castle, a horse drawn carriage through the gardens, a reception overlooking the Irish Sea and a end of the night celebration in a small quaint pub with live music. I still look back in disbelief that our initial dream became such a beautiful moment that we never will forget. None of it would have been possible without the help of Rosemarie. I think she honestly cares about making your moment special. So in short, I can’t imagine there is anyone better that you could plan your wedding with.

Steve and Devon Swanson, Minnesota

(Wedding in Johnstown Castle, Sept 2010)

Venue: Johnstown Castle & Golf Package Wexford, Ireland

Malta for Weddings

With its med climate, historic sites, beautiful sea and fabulous venues, Malta is one of the most requested wedding destinations for Runaway Bride and Groom clients.  The small island is steeped in culture and history so there is lots for your guests to do during their stay.  Everyone speaks english and wedding paper work is very straight forward for civil or Catholic weddings. There is no residency requirement and with short direct flights from Ireland and the UK,  Malta will remain on our popularity  list for years to come!

We sent our Honeymoon Testers to renew their vows in Malta and check out different venue options for you;

Getting Married in France

chateau_miniGetting married in a chateaux in France sounds very romantic and is very romantic. However it does have its complications. There is a manditory 40 day residency requirement prior to the wedding so this often makes couples look to other countries for their dream wedding.  Only civil weddings are legally recognised in France, so religious ceremonies have no legal standing. If you want to marry in a French church then you will also have to go through a civil ceremony at another venue. A lot of couples consider having a civil marriage at home and then a religious wedding in France.

However if your heart is set on France as the country you want to start your married life in well this is what you need to know:

At least one of the partners to be married must reside in the place where the wedding will take place for at least 40 days immediately prior to the wedding. One or both of you must reside in the departement (district) or the arrondissement (if in Paris) for at least 30 days prior to the marriage. Following these 30 days, French law requires the publication of the marriage banns at the Mairie (Town Hall) for 10 days. Thus 40 days is the minimum period of residence before a civil ceremony can take place.

Non French nationals must provide the following before the banns can be published:

1. A pre-marital certificate, which is obtained at the Mairie (town hall) where the wedding will take place.
2. A certified birth certificate issued less than six months prior to the date of the marriage
3. A passport (carte de séjour)
4. A certificate of residence (provided by your embassy)
5. A prenuptial certificate of health (certificat d’examen médical prénuptial) issued less than two months prior to the date of the marriage by a medical doctor after: serological tests for syphilis, irregular anti-bodies, rubella and toxoplasma. It is possible to have these tests done in France.
6. If you have married previously, a certified copy of the death certificate of the deceased spouse or a certified copy of the final divorce decree
7. A notarised “Affidavit of Law” (Certificat de Coutume), drawn up by a solicitor in the state of residence of the parties, stating that: the person is free to marry, and the marriage performed in France will be recognized as valid in the home country.
8. A personal certificate of celibacy (provided by your embassy)
9. The documents must be translated into French. The translations and the original document must be verified by the French Consulate General (vérification de traduction).
10. Foreign documents must be legalized prior to being given to the French authorities. Obtaining an Apostille can legalize documents.
11. On arrival in France, you should contact the Mairie to see if any other documents are required.

A minimum of four weeks may be needed to complete the necessary documentation and to reserve the wedding date and location. The Wedding Planners Castle Guide 2009 features a number of chateaux’s available for weddings.

Re-Marrying in Ireland if you were Previously Married

The Wedding Planner in Ireland thinks the best way to give you this information is to give you the official line from the horses mouth! (ie. The Wedding Planner doesn’t have a horses mouth we’re talking about relevant Irish government department!).

coupleRe-marriage of persons who have been previously married:

If either party has been married previously, it is necessary for that party to produce either a Divorce Decree (Absolute) or a Death Certificate, as appropriate.

If either of the parties to a proposed marriage were previously married this fact should be brought to the attention of the Registrar of Marriages at the time that the written notification to marry is being given by the parties to the proposed marriage.

In the case of a divorce granted by a Court of another State the following procedure applies. If the Divorce Decree is in a foreign language, an English translation of the Divorce should be provided, duly certified by a relevant official body or recognised translation agency. In the case of a foreign divorce, consideration is given to the question of whether the divorce is recognisable under Irish law. In this regard certain information as to place of birth, countries of residence and other relevant facts must be supplied on a questionnaire provided by the Registrar. The information is then forwarded to the General Register Office, whose consent must be obtained before the ceremony can take place.

In the case of a divorce granted by the Irish Court the Court decree in relation to the divorce should be presented to the appropriate Registrar of marriages at the point in time when the written notification of intention to marry is being given by both parties.

It should be noted that a distinction exists between nullity, separation and divorce and the broad distinctions are outlined below:

  • if no valid marriage existed in the first instance a decree of nullity may be sought from the Irish Courts – a civil decree of nullity means that the first marriage had no legal effect and the parties concerned are free, in civil law, to marry.
  • If a valid marriage is in place and a couple separate (by judicial means or by agreement) re-marriage of the parties concerned is not permitted;
  • If the parties to a valid marriage subsequently divorce (and this divorce is recognised by this State) the parties concerned may re-marry in civil law.

The procedures involved in seeking decrees of nullity, separations or divorces are a matter for the appropriate Courts and Registrars of Marriage do not have any function in regard to those procedures. Contact should be made directly with the appropriate Courts Offices.

It should be noted that an annulment granted by the authorities of the Roman Catholic Church does not have any effect in civil law and persons who have obtained a church annulment only are not free to remarry in civil law.

For more information about Irish weddings or weddings Ireland see  www.theweddingplanner.ie 

Looking for Wedding Service Providers

The Wedding Planner is always looking for new wedding specialist service providers to recommend to her wedding couples in Ireland and abroad.

If you are a wedding specialist who has not yet been discovered by The Wedding Planner and would like her to know about your services, please contact; rosie@theweddingplanner.ie

Please note: As this is a recommendation service, it cannot be guaranteed that The Wedding Planner will agree to represent your service to her wedding clients. Also The Wedding Planner is limiting the number of select services she features in the directory of the www.theweddingplanner.ie so please do not be offended if your service is declined.

Selecting Your Wedding Jewellery

rings-and-glassFor each particular style of wedding gown, you need to choose particular styles of jewellery. And since you can’t wear your gown into jewellery shops, you will want to wear a top  the same colour as your dress as well as the same neckline.

Starting with the earrings, you need to think about how you are going to wear your hair. If you have a shorter style or you’re looking to pull your hair up for the wedding day, you should pick longer earrings that extend towards your neck.

If you want something simpler, then diamond or rhinestone studs can be equally beautiful.

The neck is the focal point for most brides. If your dress has a lot of detail choose a necklace that’s simple rather than too fussy. Otherwise you will have multiple looks competing with one another and it can create a very confused and scattered look.

For a simple dress with a deep neckline, you should be looking at larger pendants or a more complicated style. Pearls always seem to work, but try on different lengths to make sure that they complement the entire look. And remember, buying pearls for yourself is bad luck so make sure someone else completes the purchase for you!!